The International style L.A. Department of Water and Power building at night, 1965.

(Source: nbm.org)

Happy Mother’s Day!

"It looks like Mother’s Day will be much like any other day for Mrs. Sherry Raser, 25, of North Hollywood, as she carefully balances 2-month-old Christopher in one arm while attempting to feed last spoonful of breakfast to Kerry, 1 1/2, with free hand. David, 3, waits patiently for second serving." 

- Los Angeles Valley Times, 1958

(Source: lapl.org)

Night and the city: Los Angeles, 1951.

(Source: digitallibrary.usc.edu)

May 6

A huge crowd turns out to celebrate the opening of Union Station, Los Angeles, May 4, 1939. 

"Stirring awake memories that had slumbered for more than a century, railroad officials yesterday staged a colorful pageant of transportation that thrilled thousands of Angelenos for two hours. Gayly costumed ladies of the Gay Nineties — and the years before — rode stage coaches and horse cars and stuttering, slow-moving trains of another era. Derby-hatted, mustachioed gentlemen in tight coats pumped high-wheeled bicycles — ‘bone-crushers’ they were known as in those days — all to celebrate formal opening of the new Union Station, pictured in background as oldest Union Pacific train approaches the city’s newest in beautiful architecture." — The Los Angeles Examiner 

(Source: digitallibrary.usc.edu)

May 3

The sun rises over the Hollywood Hills during the Easter services at the Hollywood Bowl, Los Angeles, 1939.

(Source: lapl.org)

Behind the wheel on a drive down Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, 1939. View is towards the east from the Rossmore Avenue intersection.

(Source: lapl.org)

The Aztec-influenced Art Deco Belmont Theater at night, Long Beach, 1929. The building still stands on 2nd Street, sans tower.

(Source: library.ca.gov)

Looking west down Hollywood Boulevard from Las Palmas, Los Angeles, 1955.

(Source: lapl.org)

The old Los Angeles County Courthouse, with City Hall in the background, late 1920’s. The Courthouse - seriously damaged in the Long Beach Earthquake of ‘33 - was demolished in 1936.

(Source: catalog.library.ca.gov)

As dusk gathers, a long, snaking line of cars wait to enter the first drive-in theater in Los Angeles, 1934. The theater was located at 10860 West Pico Boulevard.

(Source: huntington.org)

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