Happy Mother’s Day!

"It looks like Mother’s Day will be much like any other day for Mrs. Sherry Raser, 25, of North Hollywood, as she carefully balances 2-month-old Christopher in one arm while attempting to feed last spoonful of breakfast to Kerry, 1 1/2, with free hand. David, 3, waits patiently for second serving." 

- Los Angeles Valley Times, 1958

(Source: lapl.org)

Night and the city: Los Angeles, 1951.

(Source: digitallibrary.usc.edu)

May 6

A huge crowd turns out to celebrate the opening of Union Station, Los Angeles, May 4, 1939. 

"Stirring awake memories that had slumbered for more than a century, railroad officials yesterday staged a colorful pageant of transportation that thrilled thousands of Angelenos for two hours. Gayly costumed ladies of the Gay Nineties — and the years before — rode stage coaches and horse cars and stuttering, slow-moving trains of another era. Derby-hatted, mustachioed gentlemen in tight coats pumped high-wheeled bicycles — ‘bone-crushers’ they were known as in those days — all to celebrate formal opening of the new Union Station, pictured in background as oldest Union Pacific train approaches the city’s newest in beautiful architecture." — The Los Angeles Examiner 

(Source: digitallibrary.usc.edu)

May 3

The sun rises over the Hollywood Hills during the Easter services at the Hollywood Bowl, Los Angeles, 1939.

(Source: lapl.org)

Behind the wheel on a drive down Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, 1939. View is towards the east from the Rossmore Avenue intersection.

(Source: lapl.org)

The Aztec-influenced Art Deco Belmont Theater at night, Long Beach, 1929. The building still stands on 2nd Street, sans tower.

(Source: library.ca.gov)

Looking west down Hollywood Boulevard from Las Palmas, Los Angeles, 1955.

(Source: lapl.org)

The old Los Angeles County Courthouse, with City Hall in the background, late 1920’s. The Courthouse - seriously damaged in the Long Beach Earthquake of ‘33 - was demolished in 1936.

(Source: catalog.library.ca.gov)

As dusk gathers, a long, snaking line of cars wait to enter the first drive-in theater in Los Angeles, 1934. The theater was located at 10860 West Pico Boulevard.

(Source: huntington.org)

Amazing Kodachrome view of street life around the upper Angels Flight station, in its original Bunker Hill location at 3rd and Grand, 1960. Adjacent to the station is the old Elks Building, now demolished.

(Source: huntington.org)

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